Ingrid K.

New Years Resolutions

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...and why you don't need them.

New Years Resolutions.

res·o·lu·tion
1: the act or process of resolving: as
a: the act of analyzing a complex notion into simpler ones
b: the act of answering : solving
c: the act of determining

So my question is, why wait until the New Year?

Let’s say it’s April. The temperature is rising. You need to shed some “insulation”. So, the obvious choice is to wait until January 1st of the next year or realize you made this resolution 4 months ago. Right?

Wrong.

You don’t need New Years Resolutions. When you make a resolution January 1st, it’s meant to be broken. And on top of that, there aren’t any consequences. If you don’t do it—you don’t do it. You make it your resolution the next year.

To make a resolution, you have to not only set a goal but you have to create a plan to get there. No more “I’m going to get a better job” or “I’m going to work out 3 times a week”.
How are you going to get a better job? What kind of job do you want? Why are you working out 3 times a week? Do you want to lose weight? When do you want to lose that certain amount of weight by? What kind of exercises are you going to do?
Goals are much more accessible by creating tasks and paths. Setting milestones and rewards for yourself. Consequences if you stray. And by all means, start those resolutions now! Don’t wait until the new year. Don’t wait until Monday. Start today. If you want to change something, do it the moment you think of it so you can set a goal and create steps to reach it. It’ll get easier once you start the momentum and you’ll have reasonable and reachable steps to complete your (possibly ongoing) goal.

Sure, make some New Years Resolutions and do your best to keep them. But when you realize you’re an email hoarder or terrible at replying to text messages in July, propose the actions you’re going to take to better yourself that minute. Whether it takes you a few moments to create new email folders to filter mail into or weeding through and deleting emails at least twice a week (Mondays and Thursdays)—don’t wait. The quicker you resolve your problems and complete your goals, the easier (and happier!) your life will be.

Now check out these articles to get you started!

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